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Archive for the ‘book’ Category

Spring cleaning book giveaway

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It’s (finally) spring here in Cleveland, and that means it’s time to clean out my office. I’ve got an entire shelf of books here that I’ve accumulated in the past 12 months that aren’t doing much, so during the next few weeks I’m going to send them to a few lucky readers.

First up is “The Checklist Manifesto” by Atul Gawande. I wrote about this one in a recent column:

In his latest book, “The Checklist Manifesto,” Gawande talks about how simple checklists have helped doctors in ICUs across the country reduce infection rates to statistically zero. They make sure doctors remember stuff like wash your hands before operating and cover the patient in sterile cloths before you cut him open. Not rocket science, but easy enough to overlook in a crowded operating room.

The checklist programs started with nurses, the people doing most of the hands-on work with patients day to day. They really caught on after hospital administrators gave nurses the power to call out doctors when they missed key steps on the list.

Gawande describes three types of problems these lists help solve: simple, complicated and complex. A simple problem is like replacing a light bulb. It has a few steps that anyone could accomplish, and repeat. A complicated problem is one that involves lots of people and decisions, but can be divided into many simple problems – like launching a rocket.

It’s a quick read, and this slightly dog-eared copy is already lovingly annotated for increased ease of use.

It’s all yours. Just send me an email at cbowen@gie.net and include a note about a simple process or tactic you’ve implemented in your business that has made you more efficient.

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

April 15th, 2013 at 4:52 pm

Winter reading

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For your winter reading list and gift-giving pleasure, here’s a comprehensive list of 100 books on landscape architecture and design.

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

November 30th, 2012 at 3:42 am

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A time for change

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It’s no surprise to anyone who works outside that the weather has been weird, and it’s getting weirder.

Nationwide, average temperatures have been getting warmer for years. We’ve got about two weeks’ worth of warmer days now than we did in the 1900s, with the west coast getting warmer than the east coast.

But why is this happening? Robert Krulwich, NPR science correspondent, in a review of “Global Weirdness,” a new book that examines worldwide climate change, explains why this is good for some and bad for others:

But what if we check out a smaller region, say the Sonoma/Napa wine country in California? There the data say, “The growing season has lengthened by a full 66 days, from 254 to 320, since 1950 — much to the delight of winemakers in the region.”

So this warming trend is welcome — if you grow grapes. But if you are a winter wheat farmer, and you need cool winter temperatures for your wheat to grow — then this is not a happy development.

Now comes the big question: Why is this happening? The Climate Central folks don’t jump to any quick conclusions. “Natural variations in climate account for some of these changes,” they say.

But here’s a clue: daytime has always been warmer than nighttime, (obviously, because the sun is up). But that difference is narrowing. The first frosts usually come at night, and sub-freezing nights are rarer now. Why would the nights be getting warmer?

You can read the full story here to find out.

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

September 18th, 2012 at 3:45 pm

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Weekly round-up

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We’ve been a bit lax the past couple of weeks, so here’s an extra-long weekly round-up for your weekend reading pleasure. Stay cool out there!

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

July 6th, 2012 at 4:43 pm

The myth of multi-tasking

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When you do many things at once (which, technically, is impossible), your brain tricks you into thinking you’re doing them all well. But Sherry Turkle, author of “Alone Together,” explains that trying to multitask actually makes you less productive.

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

June 14th, 2012 at 11:11 am

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Free stuff!

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***UPDATE: Congrats to our winner Greg Fracker, president at Colorscapes By Desig in Newark, Ohio, who responded with lightning-fast timing to snag the book. And don’t worry – we’ve got a ton more books to get rid of share with you, so stay tuned.

We’re doing some more spring cleaning here at the Lawn & Landscape offices. This latest round has turned up “In Search of the Obvious” by Jack Trout. We interviewed Jack when the book came out, and we featured his groundbreaking “Positioning” last year.

So, if you could use a fresh perspective on your approach to marketing, send me an email at cbowen@gie.net and I’ll drop it in the mail.

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

March 12th, 2012 at 4:39 pm

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