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Archive for the ‘research’ tag

Weekly round-up

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We’re all over the map this week: goats, pet food, World War I-era trees and an in-depth look at how Americans self-identify as middle class.

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

August 9th, 2013 at 6:48 pm

Weekly round-up

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Big week this week. Lots of cool stuff on new turf research, end-of-year plans and why your truck is now the most-stolen vehicle in America.

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July 12th, 2013 at 4:08 pm

Weekly round-up

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Some very cool stuff this week: New research examines the health benefits of green space, a big western city is raising water rates because people are saving too much water and Pittsburgh reinvents itself from a black smudge of steel factories to a champion of sustainability. There’s hope for us all.

See you next week.

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

April 19th, 2013 at 6:44 pm

Weekly round-up: Forest edition

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a Forest Year from motionkicker on Vimeo.

This week I’ve got a lot of cool forest stuff for you, as well as the latest research on America’s Hispanic population and a neat case study on water savings. Needless to say, it’s a grab bag. Have a great weekend!

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

March 15th, 2013 at 6:45 pm

Wasted windshield time

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A new study out from the Texas A&M Transportation Institute says the nation’s commuters wasted a total of $121 billion in fuel and time in traffic in 2011.

The new report from the Texas A&M Transportation Institute found that Americans wasted an average of $818 each sitting in traffic in 2011. That also meant more carbon dioxide entering the atmosphere.

The worst commute in the country? Washington. Commuters in the nation’s capital needed almost three hours for a trip that should take 30 minutes without traffic, according to the report. That compares to the least congested city – Pensacola, Fla. – where commuters needed only nine extra minutes.

On average, Americans allowed for an hour of driving time for a trip that would take 20 minutes without traffic. The total nationwide added up to 5.5 billion additional hours that Americans spent in their cars during 2011.

Wherever you live, time spent wasted in traffic is never fun. To help, we’ve got seven ways to route your crews smarter.

And, if you can’t avoid the traffic, make the most of it: Head over to the Lawn Care Radio Network and download some of our great podcasts.

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

February 5th, 2013 at 12:20 pm

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Deadly jobs report

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Thankfully, landscaping doesn’t top the BLS list of deadliest jobs, but it still ranks pretty high. According to the most recent data, landscape services saw a 25% jump in fatal injuries from 2010 to 2011. According to the report:

Fatal work injuries in the professional and business services sector were up 16 percent, led by an increase in fatalities in landscape services to 167 in 2011 from 133 in 2010.

To keep your crews (and yourself) safe out there, check out some of our most recent safety coverage. You’ll be glad you did.

Image via NPR.

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

January 23rd, 2013 at 5:52 pm

Posted in education,research

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Weekly round-up

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For your reading pleasure, here’s our latest collection of interesting stuff from the web. Have a great weekend!

 

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

December 7th, 2012 at 2:29 pm

Weekly round-up

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Here’s our weekly collection of interesting stuff from the web. Enjoy, and have a great weekend!

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

November 30th, 2012 at 2:11 pm

Big data and consumer preferences

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I sat down with Dr. Charlie Hall last month to talk about his research into the drought, consumer attitudes and the general future of the green industry. You can read our full conversation in the forthcoming December issue of L&L, but here’s a sneak peek:

L&L: What projects are you working on? What’s got your interest right now?
Hall: It’s almost easier to answer what am I not doing. There’s consumer research and there’s research I do with colleagues on benchmarking the industry and in terms of production practices.

I’m also doing some research on the carbon footprint of shade trees right now. We call ourselves the green industry, but in many respects we’re not quite sure how green we are. Of course, the use of water for outdoor landscaping is a hot topic. So we’ve got to know what our footprint is, both in terms of carbon footprint and our water footprint for the future to be able to justify to legislators, and to city and municipal leaders, why we need to continue watering landscapes versus putting a moratorium on outdoor watering.

And I’m doing a whole lot of consumer research on people’s attitudes toward local, organic, sustainable plants. A lot of research has been done on food products but not necessarily on ornamental. So we’re looking at their attitudes on does it make a difference if a plant’s produced locally or whether it’s produced in an energy saving manner or a water saving manner. Or whether or not the plants are water conserving in the landscape. Does that mean anything to folks right now?

L&L: Can you share any initial findings or can you kind of give me an idea what people are thinking?
Hall: I’d say in general people are more responsive and more willing to pay a premium for products right now that are energy conserving rather than water conserving. But that’s also dependent on which region of the country they are. So if they’re in Michigan, they don’t think too much about whether a plant’s water conserving or not. But in Texas they do. Cause, you know in 2011 we lost a heck of a lot of plant materials down here in the state.

And a lot of folks decided, well, I think I’m gonna go back in the hardscape versus plants in my landscape. So we’re trying to measure those attitudes. They’re not looking at water conservation, either in growing the plants or water conservation in the landscape, as heavily as what we might have thought. Except in the regions of the country where that’s been hit by drought.

Hall and his team have spent years compiling research that outlines the economic benefits of plants and the tangible benefits the green industry has on people’s lives.

Apart from great cocktail party conversation, these data should be in your marketing materials and proposals. You can access his reports here.

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

November 14th, 2012 at 6:19 pm

Weekly round-up

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Here’s our digest of cool stuff that will make you smarter. Enjoy your reading, and we’ll see you Monday.

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September 21st, 2012 at 12:37 pm