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Archive for the ‘Seth Godin’ tag

Weekly round-up

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Here’s our weekly digest of cool and interesting stuff. Happy reading, and we’ll see you next week!

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

September 14th, 2012 at 7:22 pm

Weekly round-up

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Here’s our weekly digest of cool stuff from the web. Enjoy, and have a great weekend!

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

July 27th, 2012 at 2:37 pm

7 marketing sins

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Seth Godin offers up 7 marketing sins committed by small businesses.

Read them and you’ll see that they’re easy to do, especially if you’re a normal human being. But they’re not impossible to overcome.

Godin offers this advice as you work to replace your sins with acts of good business:

Humility, empathy, generosity, patience and kindness, combined with the arrogance of the brilliant inventor, are a potent alternative.

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

June 20th, 2012 at 8:45 am

Posted in marketing

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I’m pulling together my social media presentation for the OPEI annual meeting next week, and I found this TED talk from Seth Godin. In the short video, Godin outlines his thinking on tribes – the groups people organize themselves in. Increasingly, these tribes are online, and involve tools like Twitter, Facebook and other social media.

It’s worth your 15 minutes.

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

June 12th, 2012 at 7:11 pm

Weekly round-up

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Here’s our latest digest of educational, informative and interesting stories from the web. Enjoy!

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May 18th, 2012 at 7:12 am

Weekly round-up

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Here’s our digest of fun, interesting and important links from the week. Dig in and enjoy!

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April 27th, 2012 at 11:51 am

What you’re best at

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Seth Godin has a great definition of what it means to be the best in a world of online marketing and unceasing demands on your customers’ attention and budget.

The only way your business wins in Google world is to be the best available option, where “best” means best for the person searching for an answer, and “available option” means everything. (Best doesn’t mean most expensive or exclusive, it merely means the best choice for me, right now. You don’t have to be happy about how much competition you have, but it helps to admit it.)

We’ve written about this before, but it bears revisiting. Your competition is the other landscapers in your market, but it’s also a new car or a new roof or a vacation.

You don’t sell nice plants or green grass. You sell a homeowner time with his family. You sell a property manager less risk and a better conversation with his boss.

That’s what you have to tell your customer. That’s what you have to be best at.

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

April 19th, 2012 at 1:36 pm

Posted in business

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Weekly round-up

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Here’s our weekly update on cool stuff we found online. Enjoy, and have a great weekend!

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

March 31st, 2012 at 7:32 pm

Weekly round-up

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Here’s our weekly digest of cool and interesting stuff from the web. Enjoy!

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

March 16th, 2012 at 11:09 am

Menu choices

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Seth Godin on why your sales presentations should be tailored to the type of client you’re talking to:

When talking to an amateur, to a stranger, to a newbie, to someone who isn’t committed, the best path is clarity, which means simplicity. Few choices, no guessing, no hunting around.

When talking to a fellow professional, to a peer, to someone in the same groove as you, the goal is to maximize useful density of choice. Put as much power in the hands of the user as possible.

[...]

The texture of your sales pitch ought to be deeper and more sophisticated for a return customer than it should be when you’re selling door to door.

The menu at a fancy restaurant should probably have more choices and more detail than one at a fast food joint.

When dealing with any sales team or field crew, it’s easy and inviting to have one script or one presentation. But not all your clients are the same, nor do they all need the same information. HOAs have different goals than a single homeowner, and property managers want different things than a city council.

Maybe instead of a cookie-cutter approach, you have three or four or five different pitches or presentations that can be further tailored to a specific audiences. If you can accurately match your information to your prospect’s desires, you’ve made closing the deal that much easier.

Written by CBOWEN@GIE.NET

March 13th, 2012 at 1:50 pm

Posted in sales

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